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  • Writer's picturePorter DeVries

What's the Difference (Deed vs. Title)

A deed and a property title are related legal documents that are commonly used in real estate transactions, but they have distinct differences.


A deed is a legal document that transfers ownership of a property from one party to another. It is a written, signed, and usually notarized document that conveys the legal ownership of a property from a seller (grantor) to a buyer (grantee). A deed typically contains the names of the parties involved, a legal description of the property being transferred, and any relevant terms and conditions of the transfer. There are different types of deeds, such as warranty deeds, quitclaim deeds, and special warranty deeds, each with its own specific legal implications.


On the other hand, a property title refers to the legal ownership or right to ownership of a property. It is a legal concept that establishes who has legal ownership of a property, and it is typically evidenced by a written document called a "title" or "certificate of title." The title is a record of the history of ownership, transfers, and any encumbrances (such as mortgages or liens) on a property. It provides proof of ownership and serves as evidence of a person's legal right to possess and use the property.


In summary, a deed is a legal document that transfers ownership of a property from one party to another, while a property title is the legal concept of ownership or right to ownership of a property, typically evidenced by a written document. The deed is the instrument that conveys the title from one party to another, and the title serves as evidence of ownership and the history of ownership of a property.

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